Westminster Myrtle Wreath Tiara

The 6th Duke of Westminster, Gerald Grosvenor, one of the richest men in the world, died recently. We are taking a look at one of the most worn tiaras from the Westminister collection; the Fabergé Myrtle Wreath Tiara. Made in 1906 by the renowned Russian jeweller, it has been worn by many members of the family, and has been loaned to various exhibitions. We covered the tiaras worn by the current Duchess previously.

The tiara, set in brilliant diamonds, is composed of two sprays of myrtle leaves and berries, with stalks of engraved red gold, and leaves in a rubbed-over silver setting. It was made by Faberge workmaster Albert Holmström, and purchased in 1906 for the wedding of Lord Hugh Grosvenor, a son of the first Duke, and Lady Mabel Crichton, which took place in 1906. Both of their sons became Duke of Westminister because of lack of male heirs in the family.

The tiara was first pictured on Anne, last wife of the 2nd Duke of Westminster, at an event in the 1950s. She wore it with a magnificent diamond drop necklace.

The Myrtle Wreath tiara was pictured on Sally, Duchess of Westminister, wife of the 4th Duke, and daughter-in-law of Lord Hugh and Lady Mabel. She wore it in a photograph with diamond drop earrings.

The tiara was next seen on Laura Montagu, now Countess of Burlington, who wore it during a photoshoot when she tried on major pieces of the Westminister collection.

In 2004, Lady Tamara Grosvenor,daughter of the 6th Duke, married Edward Bernard Charles van Cutsem. She wore the Fabergé Myrtle Wreath Tiara for the wedding ceremony along with floral diamond earrings.

The Myrtle Wreath Tiara was last seen in 2008, when Lady Rosanagh Innes-Ker married the Viscount Grimston at Floors Castle, the family seat of her father, the Duke of Roxburghe. She borrowed the tiara from her maternal uncle, the 6th Duke.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 1.12.30 PM

 

For more information, check out:

Royal Magazin

 

 

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