Christie’s Magnificent Jewels- 14 November 2017

It’s that time of year again! The famous Auction Houses Sotheby’s and Christie’s are having their annual Autumn Magnificent and Noble Jewels Auctions in Geneva. As part of our annual tradition, we are featuring the notable jewels of Royal and Noble from the Christie’s Magnificent Jewels Sale on November 14th in Geneva.

Diamond Brooch | Diamond Fringe Necklace | Diamond Bracelet | Diamond Three-row Necklace | Emerald and Diamond Ring | Diamond Ring | Sapphire and Diamond Ring

EstimateCHF 30,000 – CHF 50,000 |CHF 250,000 – CHF 400,000|CHF 200,000 – CHF 300,000|CHF 1,300,000 – CHF 2,200,000|CHF 500,000 – CHF 800,000|CHF 1,200,000 – CHF 2,000,000| CHF 1,200,000 – CHF 2,000,000

Property of an Italian Noble Family

A Diamond Brooch, Diamond Fringe Necklace, Diamond Bracelet, Diamond Three-row Necklace, Emerald and Diamond Ring, Diamond Ring, and a Sapphire and Diamond Ring on Auction are from the collection from an Italian Noble Family. The owner wore these pieces at glittering receptions and gala performances at La Scala in Milan in the 1950s and 60s.

Two Early 20th Century Jewellery Auction CataloguesTwo Early 20th Century Jewellery Auction Catalogues

Estimate: CHF 2,000 – CHF 3,000 | CHF 2,000 – CHF 3,000

Despite not being pieces of jewellery, some notable pieces are two Auction Catalogues od the Joyaux de Madame la Princesse Lobanoff de Rostoff née Princess Dolgorouky Sale from 12-17 January 1920 in Vevey, Switzerland and two Auction Catalogues of the Joyaux de SAI Madame la Princess Mathilde Sale from 26 May – 4 June 1904 in Paris and the Les Bijoux de S.M. le Sultan Abd-Ul-Hamid II Sale from 27-29 November and 4-11 December 1911, in Paris, France.

Le Grand Mazarin

Estimate: On Request

Formerly in the French Crown Jewels

Embed from Getty Images

In spite of much larger pieces on offer, the most remarkable jewel in the Auction is the Grand Mazarin, an old, 19.07 carat, pale pink, diamond that was formerly in the French Crown Jewels. Said to originate from the famed Golconda mine in India, the diamond takes its name from Cardinal Mazarin, Chief Minister to King Louis XIII and King Louis XIV, and was the largest in his collection of eight square-cut diamonds. After his death, the Cardinal’s collection was inherited by King Louis XIV, and placed in the French Crown Jewels, where it remained until it was bought by Frederic Boucheron in the famous French Crown Jewels Auction in 1887. In private hands for almost a century and a half, the Grand Mazarin is predicted to be acquired by the Friends of the Louvre Museum, which will reunite the diamond with other pieces from the French Crown Jewels.

Christie’s Magnificent Jewels- 14 November 2017

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5 thoughts on “Christie’s Magnificent Jewels- 14 November 2017

  1. The two diamond necklaces are gorgeous and I wouldn’t mind having the sapphire ring as well. But, alas, I’m afraid all three are way above my pay grade. 😉 I do hope the friends of the Louvre manage to buy the Grand Mazarin. I guess it depends on how deep are their pockets. They’re not even venturing an estimate, except upon request. Given its properties and its provenance, it might fetch quite a price!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hoping for the friends of the Louvre to buy it too, but I agree that it might be sold as one of the most expensive diamonds ever, which may make it harder for the Louvre!

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  2. You know, I hope that its current owner favors the Louvre. Could that happen? Do pieces in auction have to go to the highest bidder or can the owner choose the buyer?

    Liked by 1 person

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