Wedding of Prince George of Denmark and Anne Bowes-Lyon, 1950

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The Wedding of Prince George of Denmark and Anne Bowes-Lyon, Viscountess Anson, in the Private Chapel at Glamis Castle in Scotland on this day in 1950. Royal Guests and Relatives included Queen Elizabeth (aunt of the bride) and Princess Margaret, Prince Axel and Princess Margretha of Denmark (parents of the groom), Count Flemming and Countess Ruth of Rosenborg (brother and sister-in-law of the groom), Crown Prince Olav(uncle of the groom), Princess Ragnhild and Princess Astrid of Norway (cousins of the groom), Prince Carl Bernadotte (uncle of the groom), Princess Josephine Charlotte of Belgium (cousin of the groom), and the Earl of Strathmore (cousin of the bride), Baron and Baroness Clinton (maternal grandparents of the bride), the Earl and Countess Granville (aunt of the bride), Lord Levson, and the Hon. Patrick Anson and Hon. Elizabeth Anson.

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Royal Musings

2 thoughts on “Wedding of Prince George of Denmark and Anne Bowes-Lyon, 1950

  1. That was a huge array of royals attending the wedding of a minor royal (Prince George of Denmark) with an even minor and divorced aristocrat (Anne, Vicountess Anson). More royals attended this wedding than that of Princess Margaret to Lord Snowdon, even though she was the sister of the Queen of Great Britain and both were single. Only Queen Ingrid of Denmark attended that wedding, and only because Prince Margaret was her goddaughter. I really wonder why such a marked difference.

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    1. Most of those royals were quite near relations (uncles, aunts & cousins) and Prince George’s parents were quite connected with their royal relatives (who were all related to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and at his wedding too)! By the time of Princess Margaret’s wedding, the British Royals had stopped going to foreign royal events and perhaps the British government realised that because they send the Queen to Queen Juliana’s Silver Wedding in 1962 to try and mend relations! Since then, foreign royal attendance at British Royal events has always been quite high, even though it is not usually reciprocated!

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